AFFAIRS IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.  HEARINGS BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON THE PHILIPPINES OF THE UNITED STATES
SENATE.  57TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION
HEARINGS BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON THE PHILIPPINES OF THE UNITED
STATES SENATE IN RELATION TO AFFAIRS IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
WASHINGTON, D. C., January 31, 1901.

Hon. WILLIAM H. TAFT, civil governor of the Philippine Islands appeared before
the committee.

STATEMENT OF GOVERNOR WILLIAM H. TAFT

SECOND TRIP OF THE COMMISSION

MARINDUQUE

We then went across to Marinduque. At the time we were there there was a Colonel
Abad in the mountains with about one hundred and fifty rifles and insurgents. The
people of Marinduque have a higher average intelligence than those in almost any of
the other provinces.  The Jesuits were located there, and the Jesuits are good
educators; and I suppose more people in Marinduque speak Spanish than possibly in
any other part of the islands.

JESUIT ORDER.

Senator ALLISON.You say the Jesuits were there?
Governor TAFT. They were.
Senator ALLISON.Have they a college?
Governor TAFT. They have a parish.
Senator BEVERIDGE.In this connection, is it true that the Jesuits are not among the
chief orders and that they hold no land, but devote themselves to education?
Governor TAFT. They are a monastic order, and so come under the general title of
friars, but, speaking from a Filipino standpoint, they are not friars.
Senator BEVERIDGE.And do not own any land?
Governor TAFT. No, sir; they own some churches and some schools.  We met the
representatives of towns in Marinduque, but we said to them that we did not think it
wise, with the insurgents in the mountains, to organize, but if they would bring in those
people when we came back we would organize them into a province. When we got back
Colonel Abad was one of the delegates, and all his men were there. I should not say all
of his men, but his officers were there and we organized the province. That was on our
return.

From Marinduque we went to Romblon. Romblon has always been a most peaceful
province, and that was the first Visayan province we came to. That showed the
difference between the two orders in the matter of language. In Marinduque a Spanish
interpreter was all we needed. Before we went to Romblon we had to take two Visayan
interpreters-that is, we had to take an interpreter who understood Spanish and what is
called the northern Visayan, and one who understood the Cebuyan Visayan, because
people speaking these two do not understand each other.

VISIT TO MARlNDUQUE.
From Sorsogon we came over to the island of Marinduque, and we found that 150
insurrectos, under Colonel Abad, had surrendered, and we organized Marinduque.

ORDER NO. 179.
GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS DIVISION OF THE PHlLIPPINES, No. 179.  Manila, P.
I., July 20, 1901.
I. The following-named provinces, Benguet, Pangasinan, Bataan, Tayabas, Romblon,
Oriental Negros, Antique, Leyte, Ambos Camarines, Marinduque, Cavite, Surigao,
Pampanga, Tarlac, Bulacan, Masbate. Occidental Negros, Iloilo, Capiz, Albay,
Sorsogon, Rizal, Nueva Ecija, Misamis, having been designated by the United States
Philippine Commission as fully organized by legislative acts and as being in such
satisfactory state of pacification and sufficiently well advanced in details of civil
administration as to warrant passing under the civil executive jurisdiction of the civil
governor, it is ordered:

REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL GOVERNORS AND OTHERS ON GENERAL
CONDITIONS IN TWENTY-THREE PROVINCES IN WHICH THERE IS NO
INSURRECTION

Boac, MARlNDUQUE, December 25, 1901 4:45p.m.
CIVIL GOVERNOR, Manila:
Replying to your telegram 18th, received this date, letters as per request have been
mailed. Marinduque is enjoying peace, happiness and prosperity, so that American army
officers and civilians travel through the province alone and unarmed, as they would in
their own country. Marinduque is engaged in peaceful avocations, and sincerely loves
America and has faith and confidence in the future.
PARAS, Governor

PROVINCE OF MARINDUQUE
BOAC, MARINDUQUE, P. L, December 20, 1901.
Mr. WH. H. TAFT,
Governor Philippine Islands P. I.

Sir: As you are soon to visit America, a letter from the treasurer of Marinduque as to its
peaceful conditions, for you to take along with you, may result beneficially. Frankly, the
man or men who have spent ten days on this island and are not positive that the sores
of war and dissatisfaction against the United States Government have all passed away
and that there exists, instead, a feeling of confidence, admiration, and regard, as well as
peace, business activity, and general prosperity, are seeing "spooks," ignorant of the
true conditions and wholly unable to read or comprehend the unmistakable evidence
which is abundantly shown in every pueblo and barrio.

Having been here since June 15, now nearly six months, during which time I have, as
"tax collector," touched, financially, some member of each family, and from my
observation and study of the pulse of the whole people, I am convinced beyond doubt
that "the war drums throb no longer and the battle flags are furled," and that if the
principles as outlined by our noble, martyred President and as administered by you and
your associates are continued and the inhabitants of Marinduque are let alone, treated
honestly, equally, and respectfully by all Americans, soldiers as well as civilians, and
accorded proper and kind treatment by officials, both military and civil, Mr. Roosevelt
and the home Administration, as well as you and the Commission, need feel no
uneasiness.

My wife remarked the other day that she had never heard the sound of hammer and
saw to such an extent as in Boac during the last few weeks. What is true of Boac is
equally true of each of the other five municipalities.

Enlargement of tiendas, improvement of casas, erecting new ones, business, and an
occasional fiesta is the order of the day.

Public schools, for both boys and girls, are in full blast, and every day I see, passing my
office window, hundreds of bright and happy children, who frequently bid me "Good
afternoon, Senor Tesorero."

The presidentes and other municipal officials are conscientious and diligent in the
performance of their duty. They take kindly to our advice, and new methods as
suggested by us are put into execution as soon as practicable. None have been
suspended or even reprimanded for neglect of duty or abuse of power. All seem to take
pleasure and a lively interest in their work, and are laboring for the welfare and
advancement of their people.

As for the "common people," they are and have been since my arrival busily engaged in
their different lines of agriculture and the gathering of hemp, an extraordinary amount of
which has been exported from these ports in the last three months. On all roads are
daily seen lines of pack ponies and carrabao sleds loaded not as of yore with insurgent
chow and ammunition, but with large bundles of beautiful white hemp for the Manila
market, which, when disposed of, places the pesos in the pockets of the poorer classes.
When I meet them on the roads or see them at work in the rice fields, while on my
rounds, I make it a point to say a pleasant word to each and inquire as to their health
and condition, an I am glad to say I have found the families of most all of them happy,
contented, and prosperous.

Taxes of all kinds-industrial, urbana, and cedula-are paid good naturedly and without
complaint.

In fact, on Marinduque, Old Glory waves over an island of peace, happiness, and
prosperity whose inhabitants are crowned with the blessings of Almighty God.

I am at present engaged in organizing a club for the advancement and amusement of
the young men. The object is to instruct them in new American outdoor sports, such as
baseball, tennis, football, etc., with the hope that by giving them many other kinds of
pleasant games we will be able to gradually wean them from the cock pits and monte
tables, as I firmly believe that many young Filipino drifts into these places to spend his
idle moments an satisfy his desire for pleasure simply because there is no nobler styIe
of amusement open to him.  The organization will be perfected in each municipality and
friendly
competition between the different towns will be fostered and encouraged.  As yet this is
in its infancy, but it will be full grown by the time you return; and I hope it will result
beneficially to the youth of Marinduque, as well as set an example which can be
advantageously followed by the young of other provinces.
Respectfully,
AMZI  B. KELLY,
Provincial Treasurer, Boac, Marinduque, P. I.

Official copy respectfully referred to his excellency the civil governor of the Philippine
Islands, Washington, D. C.
A. W. FERGUSSON,
Executive Secretary

EPIDEMIC DISEASE AFFECTING HORSES, THE RINDERPEST, AND LOCUST
PLAGUE

LOCUST SWARMS

Locusts were reported in Batangas, Cebu, Ilocos Norte, Marinduque, Mindanao,
Nueva, Ecija, OccIdental Negros, Oriental Negros, and Tayabas.  Seventy tubes
containing fungus culture were sent out to these districs. Reports of results have not as
yet been received. The locusts swarms seem to be diminishing throughout the islands
owing to the advent of the dry season.