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U.S. Army Actions at Marinduque
During WW2
The invasion of Marinduque by U.S. Army troops of the 24th Division, 21st
Infantry Regiment
, Company K, started on January 3, 1945 at 3:00 am. An
advance party of 30 shuttled from Mindoro aboard two PT Boats and then using
rubber rafts landed on the beach at Buena Vista.  They did not meet any
opposition.
The two PT Boats then returned to the main landing party offshore while two
other PT Boats patrolled the beachs around Buena Vista.  At 5:00am all four PT
Boats escorted two LCI's (Landing Craft Infantry) and six LCM's(Landing Craft
Medium) and made the invasion landing at Buena Vista. The landings occurred
without incident.  They found out from some Filipinos that the Japanese were
being housed in a big building in the small downtown of Buena Vista. With the
helpful news, the U.S. troops surrounded the building. It wasn’t until they found
out about the Battle of Luzon that they were ordered to get the Japanese out of
the building. With the use of 3.5-inch bazookas, the U.S. began shooting at the
building. The Japanese never surrendered; instead, they died for their country.
On the evening of January 6th another Company of 8th Army troops were
landed at Buena Vista without incident. On the 7th, two PT Boats delivered
flame throwers and other equipment to the soldiers at Buena Vista.
On the evening of January 16th,one LCI and two PT Boats landed at Buena Vista
with 25 U.S. and Australian troops and 21 tons of supplies.
On January 30, 100 troops of the 19th Infantry and 4 tons of supplies were
delivered at Lay Lay.
On February 14, an LSM landed at Lay Lay and unloaded personnel, cargo and
vehicles.  They then took aboard, personnel, vehicles, a prisoner of war and
some small supplies and left for Mindoro.
A company of the 19th infantry landed on Marinduque Island to the northeast
and cleared a small pocket of resistance on the 11th, most of the Japanese had
previously been destoyed by guerrillas.  The remaining Japanese evacuated on
the 21st. This date is suspect as information was received by two PT Boats from
a sailboat that 4 Japanese barges left Santa Cruz on the 15th.

It was not long after the surrender of Bataan and Corregidor when radio contact
by with AFPAC headquarters in Australia was established through planetary U.S.
submarine landings in strategic points in the archipelago.  MacArthur supplied
guerillas with radios to maintain continuous contact, and arms and war
materials in preparation for the possible return of MacArthur and allied
liberation forces to the Philippines.  Morale of the guerrillas were all-time high.  
These Intel-radio nets grew wider and wider as the liberation forces surges
inch-by-inch toward the Philippines. The Callsign JI was for Untalan in
Marinduque.
The remaining Japanese evacuated on the 21st.  It was not long after the
surrender of Bataan and Corregidor when radio contact by with AFPAC
headquarters in Australia was established through planetary U.S. submarine
landings in strategic points in the archipelago.  MacArthur supplied guerillas with
radios to maintain continuous contact, and arms and war materials in
preparation for the possible return of MacArthur and allied liberation forces to
the Philippines.  Morale of the guerrillas were all-time high.  These Intel-radio
nets grew wider and wider as the liberation forces surges inch-by-inch toward
the Philippines. The Callsign JI was for Untalan in Marinduque.